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bruddog

Defending the Deep Streak Pass... PRO-TIP

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Defending the deep bomb does take some luck as sometimes you can be in near perfect/or perfect position and it still doesn't matter. But you can improve your chances by not doing the following


 


 


1. Do not just run straight back at the snap.


 


I see many new players and sometimes vets do this. Their defender is sitting all the way in the back of the endzone or far way because they just ran back and they have almost 0 chance of stopping the deep bomb unless the pass is poorly thrown to begin with. 


 


To improve your chances you have to try and make it so your defender is near the WR when the ball arrives.


 


 


Some ways to do this are.


 


1. Wait to start dropping deep with your DB until the WR has a sizeable lead down the field as your defender 


2. Run back right at the snap but come start coming back to the ball when its 1/2 to 3/4 of the way there.


3. Run back at the snap...pause for a bit...start running again. 


 


You have to have a sense of where the WR and your DB are and try to to keep him near the WR even though you can't see the players. 


 


This services message has been brought to you by bruddog


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Defending the deep JJ does take some luck as sometimes you can be in near perfect/or perfect position and it still doesn't matter. But you can improve your chances by not doing the following

 

 

1. Do not just run straight back at the snap.

 

I see many new players and sometimes vets do this. Their defender is sitting all the way in the back of the endzone or far way because they just ran back and they have almost 0 chance of stopping the deep JJ unless the pass is poorly thrown to begin with. 

 

To improve your chances you have to try and make it so your defender is near the WR when the ball arrives.

 

 

Some ways to do this are.

 

1. Wait to start dropping deep with your DB until the WR has a sizeable lead down the field as your defender 

2. Run back right at the snap but come start coming back to the ball when its 1/2 to 3/4 of the way there.

3. Run back at the snap...pause for a bit...start running again. 

 

You have to have a sense of where the WR and your DB are and try to to keep him near the WR even though you can't see the players. 

 

This services message has been brought to you by bruddog

 

J.J. stands for........................................???  Are you just talkin' about a deep out route??? (when the receiver just bolts for the endzone) ........or a deep slant, or button hook???  I use step 3 mostly.....If my corner is faster than the receiver, I use that technique...If he's slower, or slowly gains speed (like so many do) I just try to stay with the reciever PERIOD, or don't use a cornerback.

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-TB King - Sorry. JJ was a slang term that stood for jumping jackass but came to mean any deep or timed pass attempting to make the WR jump for the ball.  I'm specifically talking about any deep pass attempt of 40+ yards but really more like 60+ yards.  Basically any streak pattern or pattern that ends in a streak.


 


Defending the "timed" jump passes  is a different topic but the same principal. 


 


You brought up a good point though regarding deep passes that I forgot to mention


 


Unless your cornerback or safety has the potential of jump intercepting the QB then you are best using a cornerback or safety on the opposite side of the WR the player is likely to throw to. OR a high INT LB or defensive end.  That way you will likely have a drone covering the WR as well. Assuming you called a pass play that is. 


 


You DB's interception rating has to be within 3 ratings greater than the QB to have a 50% chance of jump intercepting the ball. If he is 4 tecmo ratings he will have 100% chance. The chances ONLY APPLY if you are in the correct spot in regards to the ball and WR. This can be very tricky sometimes.


 


6,13,19,25,31,38,44,50 56,63,69,75,81,88,94,100 are possible tecmo ratings. For example a 69 Inteception rating  DB would have a 50% chance of jump intercepting a 50 Pass Control Rating QB. 


 


If anything you are better off trying to TRAIL the WR ever so slightly so that you are "in front" of the WR and have a chance at tipping or jump intercepting the ball.


 


Just don't do what Rahim Moore did and completely misjudge it! 


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#3 is extremely dangerous because either A.) you might not be fast enough to drop back and defend the pass on time  or B.) Get caught in a situation where your defender doesn't "auto-track" the pass and you are caught out of position on a pass that you normallywould be taken to the ball.


 


Instead, I normally will do what most do while running in the open field, zig-zag. I do much shorter zigs and zags in the middle of the field and it works great when you have a fast (50 RP+) defender.


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#3 is best reserved for the fastest DB's. But yes it is a bit dangerous. And the method i rarely use.  


 


True its really almost better to either "circle around" or "zig-zag" with your DB. However when playing online vs someone who has random lag freezes zig-zagging might fail you more often if the lag freeze happens when you are changing directions. 


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If anything you are better off trying to TRAIL the WR ever so slightly so that you are "in front" of the WR and have a chance at tipping or jump intercepting the ball.

 

uh, I think this is all you need to say, unless your audience is a Nintendo Power reader in 3rd grade.  or someone who has too much time on their hands and thinks you're actually gonna help them with all of that English Literature in your post.

 

 

<TIMING is the ESSENCE of video games.  some people got it, some don't.  otherwise, all you can do is practice over and over and LEARN.>

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<TIMING is the ESSENCE of video games.  some people got it, some don't.  otherwise, all you can do is practice over and over and LEARN.>

L

O

L

 

Good stuff Bruddog. When I started playing online somehow it felt like I would play Tushar 10x per season. Anyways, he would always JJ Pass 2 R &S Fly or Pass 3 Shotgun X drive.  By season 3, I would draft a really high INT DB and plant him in-front of his moonball QB throws. JJ INTs for days. #2 FTW

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L


O


L


 


#1 "wait, then start running back" - that is timing


#2 "run back and come forward when the ball is halfway there" - that is timing


#3 "run back, then pause" - that is timing


 


L


O


L


 


...really, the point is to be in the right spot between the QB and the WR when the ball is in the air.  that is all.  this piece of advice provided by: dick. 


 


ps - the part about not zig zagging and stuff due to lag or whatever is the real GOLD here.


 


pss - you can also rush the passer and throw off the timing. dangerous, but you know - works sometimes


 


ps^3 - I do all three of these things on the list!! ! ;-)


Edited by buck

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Yes, its all timing. Those are some TIPS to get the timing right. And yes, I have to figure that SOME of my audience is about "Nintendo Power reader in 3rd grade" level.

That might even be generous

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#1 "wait, then start running back" - that is timing

#2 "run back and come forward when the ball is halfway there" - that is timing

#3 "run back, then pause" - that is timing

 

I laughed at your Nintendo Power-esque "tip" or at least what I thought was a joke. I wasn't trying to mock what you were saying.

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Yes, its all timing. Those are some TIPS to get the timing right. And yes, I have to figure that SOME of my audience is about "Nintendo Power reader in 3rd grade" level.

 

Dear Brutendo Power

 

I always get lost in the tubes in Super Mario Bros level 8-4, please help!  Also the tecmo super bowl halftime show makes me feel very warm sometimes.......

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Dear Brutendo Power

 

I always get lost in the tubes in Super Mario Bros level 8-4, please help!  Also the tecmo super bowl halftime show makes me feel very warm sometimes.......

 

I laughed a lot. I would do it again.

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  • Similar Content

    • By Knobbe
      Field Placement, Pre-snap Movement, & Post-snap Instructions
      by Xplozv (based on Jstout's great guide "NES Play Design Info")

      Jstout's guide can be found here: http://tecmobowl.org...ay-design-info/

      Formats:

      No Pre-snap movement --- Placement, Y coordinate, X coordinate, Stance

      With Pre-snap movement --- Placement, Y coordinate, X coordinate, Shift, Time, Move, Y coordinate, X coordinate, Stance
      (only one exception that we will get to later)


      Placement

      D0 Command (Absolute)

      This command can place you anywhere on the field. You only use it once per player and only to start the instructions. There is only one CON with this command. If you are not careful your player will line up out of bounds depending upon which hashmark the ball is placed on. This is where the D1 command comes in.

      D1 Command (Relative)

      This command is only used in the original for WRs & CBs. That is because they line up close to the sideline all the time. The D1 command keeps them in bounds regardless of where the ball is placed. It is relative to the middle of the field instead of the ball like D0 is. If you use D1 for more than CBs, most of your defense will not line up with the offense if the offense is on the opposite hash, making your new creation useless.

      *** Next, we will talk about coordinates. Remember 1yd is x08(hex), 1/2yd is x04(hex), 1/4yd is x02(hex) and so forth. ***

      Y Coordinates

      Imagine a vertical line from sideline to sideline. The ball is considered the center, or midpoint, of that line. The ball's "Y" is always "F0", which is where the Center & QB is always going to line up. If you're planning to match up your DL to the OL, Here are the Y coordinates of the OL on the original TSB1(nes, snes, & genesis) :

      LT= "D8" LG="E4" C="F0" RG="FC" RT="08"

      They line up exactly 1 1/2yds away from each other. Here's how we know that:

      Add in hex: D8 + 08 = E0 + 04 = E4;
      Add in hex: E4 + 08 = EC + 04 = F0;
      Add in hex: F0 + 08 = F8 + 04 = FC;
      Add in hex: FC + 08 = 04 + 04 = 08;

      *** D0 & D1 differ in Y coordinates!!!!!! ****

      D0 command is as follows:

      Top of the screen sideline is about "B8", Bottom of the screen sideline is about "38", with the ball always being the middle at "F0". Remember what I mention about the D0 command earlier. When the ball is on top hash, B8 will line your player up out of bounds, and when the ball is on the bottom hash, 38 will line up your player out of bounds. I usually go no further up than about "C0 to C8" which will put your player covering the slot area just inside the CB at the top. To give you an even better idea of how high that is on the field, the FS has a default Y coordinate of C8.

      D1 command is as follows:

      Top of screen sideline is about "40", Bottom of screen sideline is about "C8". The only Y coordinate for the D1 command that you really need to use are "36" which is for the CB at the top of the screen(RCB) and "C0" which is for the CB at the bottom of the screen(LCB) these are their default values.

      X Coordinates

      *** You have to really pay attention to these when we get to movements & shiftts(pre-snap & post-snap). ***

      Imagine a horizontal line from endzone to endzone. The ball is the center of this line, however, the ball is now "00" instead of "F0". "00" is the neutral zone for all players not to cross. By default all players are lined up 1yd off of the ball (08), with the center being the only exception, he's 3/4yd off of the ball (06). By default, the farthest players are the safeties at 10yds (50). X coordinates use what I like to call "Scale 1" and "Scale 2" measurements. Here are the scales in 1yd increments away from the ball (15yds in length).

      1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
      Scale 1: 08 10 18 20 28 30 38 40 48 50 58 60 68 70 78


      1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
      Scale 2: F8 F0 E8 E0 D8 D0 C8 C0 B8 B0 A8 A0 98 90 88


      *** Scale 1 only affects the placements commands D0, D1, and the move command D7 ***

      *** Scale 2 affects the move commands D7, D8, & D9 ***

      Stance

      The stance is always the ending of field placement. Either you're down, which is "EA" or you're standing, which is "EC". Simple as that.


      How to Apply? Practice!!!

      Let's have fun with a couple of default instructions and see what we can come up with.

      Reading Field Placement Instructions

      Default for FS is "D0 C8 50 EC". This means place(D0) 5yds above ball(C8) 10yds off the ball(50) standing(EC)
      Default for LC is "D1 C0 28 EC". This means place(D1) at bottom sideline(C0) 5yds off the ball(28) standing(EC)
      Default for NT is "D0 F0 08 EA". This means place(D0) even with ball(F0) 1yd off the ball(08) down(EA)

      Easy, huh? That is basic field placement without pre-snap movement. My advice and what has been a huge help to me is to find defensive playbook you like and/or draw your defensive formation on paper and then mark off the yards of where you want the players to line up.


      Pre-snap Movement (EB, ED, 80-8A are the shift commands)

      The Shift commands must come after the X coordinate and before the stance. The Shift commands are always followed by Time in secs(in hex), x14 is 1 second. This tells the player when exactly to begin shifting. The timing of the shift is very important because it is the difference in the defense looking professional or like a fire broke out. The is snapped by COM & COA in about 6-8 secs just to give you an idea.

      80 - 8A Command (only exception to the pre-snap format above)

      On offense, this is the Motion command. On defense is the is Follow command. The defender will follow the offensive player that you choose, everywhere that he goes. If that offensive player does not move, the defender will go line up even with him (just Y coordinate; X coordinate is not affected--- if 5yds back, will stay 5yds back). Time then Stance immediately follows this command. "8" is followed by the player chosen. Here are the players:

      QB=0, HB=1, FB=2, WR1=3, WR2=4, TE=5, C=6, LG=7, RG=8, LT=9, RT=A

      For example, our FS, "D0 C8 50 83 28 EC" means place(D0) 5yds above ball(C8) 10yds off of the ball(50) follow WR1(83) in 2 secs(28) standing(EC).

      *** With this shift command, the player will start in the down position and finish in the down position regardless of what stance you choose. ***

      EB & ED Commands

      These shift commands are also followed by time and stance but differently. Unlike the 80-8A command, YOU must tell the player exactly where to go. We do that with the move commands D7, D8, & D9. You must do this after time and before the stance. Here is a couple of examples of the EB & ED commands with the FS again:

      "D0 C8 50 EB 3C" & "D0 C8 50 ED 3C" both mean the same thing: place(D0) 5yds above ball(C8) 10yds off the ball(50) shift(EB, ED) in secs(3C)

      So, what's the difference? With "EB", player starts in down position and finishes in whichever stance you choose. With "ED", player starts in standing position and finishes in whichever stance you choose. Use "ED" for LBs and DBs and use "EB" for the DL to give the best look.

      D8 Command (Absolute ---Exact spot on field)

      D8 move command along with the D7 command is what you're probably going to use most often. D8 command uses D0's Y coordinates and Scale 2 X coordinates. Let's use our same FS as an example:

      "D0 C8 50 ED 3C D8 C8 D8 EC" now means place(D0) 5yds above ball(C8) 10yds off of the ball(50) shift from standing(ED) in 3 secs(3C) move to exactly(D8) 5yds above ball(C8) 5yds off the ball(D8) standing(EC)

      Our first pre-snap movement!!! We moved our FS 5yds closer to the Line of Scrimmage, while keeping him 5yds above the ball. Now let's move him again:

      "D0 C8 50 ED 3C D8 F0 D8 EC" now means place(D0) 5yds above ball(C8) 10yds off of the ball(50) shift from standing(ED) in 3 secs(3C) move to exactly(D8) even with the ball(C8) 5yds off the ball(D8) standing(EC)

      Now we moved our FS even with the ball and 5yds closer to the Line of Scrimmage from his default position.

      D9 Command (Relative to middle of field)

      D9 uses D1's Y coordinates and Scale 2 X coordinates. Use of the D9 command will be a rarity as the D7 & D8 command can pretty much make it obsolete. I personally don't use it at all. Mainly use it for CBs. Here is our LCB as an example:

      "D1 C0 28 ED 3C D9 C0 F8 EC" means place(D1) at bottom sideline(C0) 5yds off of the ball(28) shift from standing(ED) in 3 secs(3C) move relative(D9) to bottom sideline(C0) 1yd off of the ball "press coverage"(F8) standing(EC)

      D7 Command (Relative to player's position)

      D7 move command offers the most options. D7 is relative to your player's position. Where your player is already located is "00" for both Y & X coordinates. D7 also uses Scales 1 & 2 as both Y & X coordinates.

      *** When you want to move your player down or forward, use Scale 1. When you want to move your player up or back off the ball, use Scale 2. ***

      *** If you are only going to adjust the Y coordinate, the X coordinate will be "00". If you are only going to adjust the X coordinate, the Y coordinate will be "00". ***

      Here is a few of the many possibilities:

      Remember our FS that we lined up even with the ball and 5yds back? "D0 C8 50 ED 3C D8 F0 D8 EC" Now we can do that same thing with the D7 command.

      Here goes: "D0 C8 50 ED 3C D7 28 28 EC" place(D0) 5yds above ball(C8) 10yds off the ball(50) shift from standing(ED) in 3 secs(3C) move from current position(D7) move down 5yds(28) move forward 5yds(28) standing(EC)

      Now let's keep him 5yds above the ball and move him back 5yds so that he will be 15yds off of the ball.

      Here goes: "D0 C8 50 ED 3C D7 00 D8 EC" place(D0) 5yds above ball(C8) 10yds off the ball(50) shift from standing(ED) in 3 secs(3C) move from current position(D7) don't adjust Y coordinate(00) move back 5yds(D8) standing(EC)

      Finally let's move him down even with the ball and keep him 10yds back.

      Here goes: "D0 C8 50 ED 3C D7 28 00 EC" place(D0) 5yds above ball(C8) 10yds off the ball(50) shift from standing(ED) in 3 secs(3C) move from current position(D7) move down 5yds(28) don't adjust X coordinate(00) standing(EC)

      Folks, that is Field Placement & Pre-snap Movement in a nutshell. On to the Post-snap Instructions.


      Post-snap Instructions

      Now that you have gotten the hang of the move commands D7, D8, & D9, it's time to use them. Immediately after choosing your stance you must put postsnap instructions because defense doesn't have formation pointers like the offense. So set your player to move where you want them to with the move commands then you can give them roles or assignments. Let's use zone defense as an example. To stop in a zone coverage, the instruction is "FF EC BD".

      Here goes, using the RILB, who from his default position(without pre-snap movement) will drop into a 5yd zone in the middle of the field:

      "D0 E0 18 EC D8 F0 D8 FF EC BD" place(D0) 2yds above ball(E0) 3yds off the ball(18) standing(EC) move to exactly(D8) even with snap of ball(F0) 5yds off the ball(D8) stop and face QB or ball "zone"(FF EC BD)

      &

      "D0 E0 18 EC D7 10 F0 FF EC BD" place(D0) 2yds above ball(E0) 3yds off the ball(18) standing(EC) move from current position(D7) move down 2yds(10) move back 2yds(F0) stop and face QB or ball "zone"(FF EC BD)

      will both give you that same result.

      Now I will give you a list of instructions(nes, snes, & genesis) you can use once you get your players where you want them.


      MAN TO MAN NES SNES GENESIS

      HB FF 04 BE FF 93 FC FF 00 03 96 9C
      FB FF 08 BE FF 97 FC FF 00 03 96 A4
      WR1 FF 0C BE FF 9B FC FF 00 03 96 AC
      WR2 FF 10 BE FF 9F FC FF 00 03 96 B4
      TE FF 14 BE FF A3 FC FF 00 03 96 BC


      OTHER ROLES NES SNES GENESIS

      RUSH STRAIGHT FF AD AA FF 3C E9 FF 00 03 6F EC
      RUSH FOLLOW FF BC AA FF 4B E9 FF 00 03 70 06
      MIRROR BALL CARRIER FF C2 AA FF 51 E9 FF 00 03 70 10
      ZONE COVERAGE FF EC BD FF 7B FC FF 00 03 96 6C
      DEEP COVERAGE FF 18 BE FF A7 FC FF 00 03 96 C4

      *** When it comes to Man to Man codes, please move you defender back 3 to 7 yards back before putting in the Man to Man instructions. Because the player sits still for about 3 tecmo seconds before they move from their presnap position. So if you use right away after the stance, that player will be wide open for a good gain before the defender even makes a move. This is the reason that by default the CBs lined up 5yds off of the ball to compensate for this. ***

      Now it is time to place all these instructions somewhere to see your new defensive plays.

      The defense instructions start at xA010(NES), x165E8F w/o header(SNES) x16608F w/header(SNES), x35AA2(GENESIS). They all start with special teams. So it is safe to start overwriting the original instructions starting at xA606(NES), x16602A w/o header(SNES) x1661AC w/header(SNES), x36172(GENESIS). I personally suggest you start with the nes version first, then go to the other two. Save the GENESIS for last because putting in its instruction is nothing like the NES or the SNES. I will have section on the GENESIS all its own. I also FF out a section of the original instructions so that I can see my own clearly not to make any mistakes.

      When open a hex editor and go to these address given for a particular system, make note of the address you start at for each of those players' instructions. We will need to convert those addresses to pointers so the game knows where to look for instructions. A word to the wise, type in your instructions in this order, RE, NT, LE, ROLB, RILB, LILB, LOLB, RCB, LCB, FS, SS. This is to make things less confusing because when you go to type in your pointers, they will need to be in that order, otherwise a DL maybe lining up against a WR instead of the CB.

      Example, Nes: your first instruction goes in at xA606. Subtract x10(in hex) to get "A5F6", now swap the bytes around to get "F6A5". F6A5 is your pointer for that player's instructions. Make note of your pointers for each of the 11 players on defense for that play.

      Example, Snes: your first instruction goes in at x16602A w/o header(nearly all roms on the site will not have headers) Subtract x200(in hex) to get "165E2A", now drop first two digits(1 byte) to get "5E2A", now add x8000(in hex) to get "DE2A", now swap them to get "2ADE". 2ADE is your pointer for that player's instructions. Make note of your pointers for each of the 11 players on defense for that play.

      Example, Genesis: your first instruction goes in at x36172. Add three zeros to the beginning to get "00036172". 00036172 is your pointer. The Genesis is by far the easiest when it comes to pointers because is uses absolute addressing. Your address or offset is the pointer. You just convert it to long word by add 3 zeros to the beginnig. And that is all that is easy on the Genesis.

      Once you have all your pointers, it is time to type them where they go, but first, we must set our rom to have 8 set defenses(it is easier that way). I normally use play#s 04, 05, 06, 07, 08, 09, 0A, & 0B(in order: up a, left a, right a, down a, up b, left b, right b, down (remember Genesis top plays are b and bottom plays are a). Plays 00, 01, 02, & 03 are for special teams. So you need to copy and paste the following code(the spaces included) using a hex editor in the following addresses:

      1DC10x (NES), x161A5F w/o header(SNES), x161C5F w/header(SNES), x3C8D0(GENESIS)

      Set Def Plays

      04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B 04 05 06 07 08 09 0A 0B


      Now let's type our pointers for each play. Let's calculate Up + A(play 04) :

      NES= play # * 16(in hex) + 6010 = address where to type in pointers (RE, NT, LE, ROLB, RILB, LILB, LOLB, RCB, LCB, FS, SS)

      so: 04 * 16 = 58. 58 + 6010 = 6068. "6068" is the address where you type your pointers for play# 04. Repeat for each play.

      SNES(w/o header)= play# * 16(in hex) + 164725 = address where to type in pointers (RE, NT, LE, ROLB, RILB, LILB, LOLB, RCB, LCB, FS, SS)

      so: 04 * 16 = 58. 58 + 164725 = 16477D. "16477D" is the address where you type your pointers for play# 04. Repeat for each play.

      SNES(w/ header)= play# * 16(in hex) + 164925 = address where to type in pointers (RE, NT, LE, ROLB, RILB, LILB, LOLB, RCB, LCB, FS, SS)

      so: 04 * 16 = 58. 58 + 164925 = 16497D. "16497D" is the address where you type your pointers for play# 04. Repeat for each play.

      GENESIS= play# * 2C(in hex) + 399FC = address where to type in pointers (RE, NT, LE, ROLB, RILB, LILB, LOLB, RCB, LCB, FS, SS)

      so: 04 * 2C = B0. B0 + 399FC = 39AAC. "39AAC" is the address where you type your pointers for play# 04. Repeat for each play.


      Genesis Mini Extra Guide

      If you want to edit the Genesis plays, be prepared to be bold. When you make NES defenses or offenses, it is easy to convert them to SNES plays just by changing the appropriate instruction I gave in the list. The placements, shifts, move commands, x & y coordinates will be exactly the same as the NES. The same goes for the Genesis as all 3 systems use the exact same ones except for what I listed. Then, you just have to make your pointers for each system. With that said, here is the difference when it comes to the GENESIS for typing in those instructions. Remember our FS again? I will show you instructions for the SS this time instead, in all 3 systems.

      NES: D0 18 50 ED 3C D7 28 28 EC FF 18 BE

      SNES: D0 18 50 ED 3C D7 28 28 EC FF A7 FC

      GENESIS: 00 D0 00 18 00 50 00 ED 00 3C 00 D7 00 28 00 28 00 EC 00 FF 00 03 96 C4


      The Genesis instructions must start with "00". There is also "00" between each byte of instruction you are going to type in. The exceptions to that is the instructions in the list above in the guide, the placement command D0, & move commands D7, D8. The instructions in the list above can just be typed in as is. However, when it comes to D0, D7, & D8 commands, sometimes a "FF" byte is used instead of "00". D1 & D9 commands are not affected by this and will use "00" like everything else that does.

      *** Here are those circumstances: If your Y coordinate or X coordinate begins with a letter like "C8", you must us "FF" in front of it instead of "00". If you don't do this, your player will now show up on the field, and the game will play with only the players you typed in correctly. ***

      Example using our FS:

      "D0 C8 50 ED 3C D7 00 D8 EC FF EC BD"

      would be this in Genesis:

      "00 D0 FF C8 00 50 00 ED 00 3C 00 D7 00 00 FF D8 00 EC 00 FF 00 03 96 6C"


      Closing

      That covers the basics of everything for each system. I will be writing an advanced guide for those who want to dig even deeper into making pro style defenses. I will be covering my defenses which are usually much more complicated than all I just explained. It will deal with randomizing if a player shifts or not for a given play or how often he does. Giving a defensive player 3 to four different roles on one particular play so the offense will never know what each player is going to do regardless of the formation the opponent sees. Randomize whether a defender will break their pass coverage responsibility to help in run support. I'll even throw in a few offensive things like, shifting a QB from under center into the shotgun. All this and more will be in my next guide. Feel free to PM me if you have any questions.


      Much Thanks goes to Jstout for his guide NES Play Design Info

      which is here: http://tecmobowl.org...ay-design-info/

      I studied that for many many hours doing a lot of testing.

      View full article
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