Jump to content
MrNFL

Coming September, the Tecmo Football Legends Simulation

Recommended Posts

 


Coming this September is the Tecmo Super Bowl Football Legends Simulation!  Learn more about the teams involved in the video above.

Using my Legends rom I created, this video series puts the top team from 28 franchises against each other iinto a season-long competition.   At the end, we'll determine the greatest NFL team of all-time...at least according to Tecmo.
 

The season lasts 16 weeks, with all AFC teams playing each other and all NFC teams meeting in the first 13 weeks.    The final three weeks features AFC vs NFC play.   Follow along with video recaps of each week's games every Sunday, along with a full "Game of the Week" each Thursday.


Each team was chosen after a statistical analysis of each franchise's most successful squads.   The competitors span seven decades of professional football history, featuring 17 Super Bowl champions, five NFL champions, two AFL champions and four conference champions.   
 

AFC
1990 Buffalo Bills
1958 Baltimore Colts
1972 Miami Dolphins
2004 New England Patriots
1968 New York Jets
1988 Cincinnati Bengals
1964 Cleveland Browns
1961 Houston Oilers
1975 Pittsburgh Steelers
1998 Denver Broncos
1969 Kansas City Chiefs
1976 Oakland Raiders
1963 San Diego Chargers
2000 Baltimore Ravens
 

NFC
1992 Dallas Cowboys
1986 New York Giants
1960 Philadelphia Eagles
1952 Detroit Lions
1991 Washington Redskins
1985 Chicago Bears
2013 Seattle Seahawks
1962 Green Bay Packers
1969 Minnesota Vikings
2002 Tampa Bay Buccaneers
2015 Carolina Panthers
1999 St. Louis Rams
2009 New Orleans Saints
1984 San Francisco 49ers
 

Because the original SNES Tecmo game came out in an era with 28 teams, four franchises had to be left out.  Sorry Jaguars, Texans, Cardinals, and Falcons, your teams were the weakest :(.

Edited by MrNFL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And I did that series when I was still in high school, this one is miles ahead of that in production value alone.  :P

In the weeks leading up to the season, I'm going to post breakdowns of each of the 28 teams by decade. 

The 1950s

Statistics and rosters aren't available for any teams prior to 1950, so that had to be the cut-off point for consideration.   There are two teams from the 50s that made the cut.

1952 Detroit Lions
Record: 9-3.   Won the NFL Championship over Cleveland.
Points Per Game: 28.7 (Ranked 12th among the teams in the sim)
Allowed Per Game: 16.0 (Ranked 15th)
Point Differential: 12.7 (Ranked 12th)
Turnover Differential: +19 (Ranked 7th)
Simple Rating System: +11.3 (Ranked 13th)
ELO Rating: 1660 (Ranked 20th)
Yards Per Pass: 6.9 (Ranked 26th)
Yards Per Carry: 4.0 (Ranked 22nd)
Yards Per Play: 4.7 (Tied for 26th)
Yards Per Pass Allowed: 6.3 (Ranked 23rd)
Yards Per Carry Allowed: 3.2 (Tied for 2nd)
Yards Per Play Aloowed: 4.2 (Tied for 5th)
Head Coach: Buddy Parker, with the Lions from 1951-1956, won two titles.

Other Lions teams considered: The Lions struggles in the Super Bowl era is well documented, but they won the NFL title three times in the 50s.   Although the 1953 team was 10-2, the 1952 squad was stronger in just about all statistical categories. 

The season:  The Lions started slow, losing two of their first three games, both to San Francisco.  They went 8-1 the rest of the year, tying with the L.A. Rams in the National Division, requiring a playoff tiebreaker (back then, the only playoff game was generally the final).   The Lions beat the Rams, then won 17-7 over Cleveland for the championship.

Offense: Ranked second in points per game that year, the team was led by All-Pro and Hall of Famer Bobby Layne at QB.  He was third in the league in  passing touchdowns with 19, while adding 411 rushing yards, 9th most in the league.   Running backs Bob Hoernschemeyer and Pat Harder both were Pro Bowlers, with top receiver Cloyce Box leading the NFL with 15 receiving TDs, which is especially impressive in a 12-game season.   Additionally, the O-line featured Hall of Famer Lou Creekmur at left tackle.

Defense: Ranked first in points allowed per game in 1952, the Lions had two first-team All-Pros in DT Thurman McGraw and safety Jack Christiansen.  They were 1st in rushing yards allowed, although 10th out of 12 teams in passing yards. 

Special Teams: Kicker Pat Harder and Punter Bob Smith were both among the top guys at their position for their time.  Additionally, they had a strong return game, taking three punts back for touchdowns. 

Overall Chances in the Sim: It's especially hard to gauge and rate the oldest teams in comparison to the modern NFL.  Having a mobile QB is a unique advantage that Layne shares with few QBs in the simulation and he has a #1 target in Box that ranks among the best WRs.   Defensively, they aren't super dominant, but solid all around.   The Lions have a pretty balanced team and should be competitive in every game. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1958 Baltimore Colts
Record: 9-3
Points Per Game: 31.8 (Ranked 4th among teams in sim)
Allowed Per Game: 16.9 (18th in sim)
Point Differential: 14.9 (10th)
Turnover Differential: +30 (1st)
Simple Rating System: +14.1 (7th)
ELO Rating: 1664 (19th)
Yards Per Pass: 7.2 (24th)
Yards Per Carry: 4.7 (6th)
Yards Per Play: 5.5 (14th)
Yards Per Pass Allowed: 6.2 (20th)
Yards Per Carry Allowed: 3.9 (15th)
Yards Per Play Allowed: 4.5 (12th)
Head Coach: Weeb Ewbank, the only coach in the sim twice. With the Colts from 1954-1962 and won two titles, then won again with the Jets.

Other Colts teams considered: Between Baltimore and Indianapolis, the Colts have four championships to their name. Oddly enough, the lone Indy title from came from a 2006 team that was from a talent standpoint, one of the weakest of the Manning era. The other ones didn't get the ring, so they're out.

The 1970 Super Bowl champs, although their record was solid, are statistically even less impressive. The 1968 team was stellar and may have been one of the most talented ever, but they lost the Super Bowl to the Jets. That leaves the 58 and 59 champions. Both finished 9-3, but the 58 squad was statistically stronger in most categories. Plus, the 58 team rested players in their final two games with everything wrapped up.

The season: The Colts went 9-1 in their first 10 games, only losing by three to the Giants in week 7. With the West Division wrapped up after week 10, they rested their starters and lost the final two games of the season. They avenged their loss to the Giants in the Championship game, winning 23-17 in overtime in what has gone down in lore as the "Greatest Game Ever Played"

Offense: Their offense was stacked with four Hall of Famers, each of which were first-team All-Pro's in 58. Johnny Unitas was the top-rated QB in the league, RB Alan Ameche was second in rushing, WR/RB Lenny Moore was second in receiving yards and total yards from scrimmage, Raymond Berry was fourth in receiving yards, and anchoring the line was Jim Parker at left tackle, considered by some to be the best tackle ever.

Defense: The defensive strength was easily their line. Hall of Famer Gino Marchetti was a first-team All-Pro, along with Gene Lipscomb. Plus, they had another veteran who went to the Hall in Art Donovan. The rest of the D lacks notable accolades, but with such a strong front four, you'll be in good shape.

Special Teams: The kicking and punting game for the Colts is pretty weak, even by 1950s standards. They did see a good kick return game through.

Overall Chances in the Sim: Their offense is among the most dangerous in the simulation. One of the best quarterbacks, multiple play-makers, and a strong line; they'll be hard to stop. Their defensive line is top-tier too, even without an outstanding linebacker or secondary group. The Colts look to be one of the stronger teams in the AFC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 1960s

The 60s is the most represented group in the simulation, featuring eight teams.   Part of the reason is due to the AFL, with four AFL teams and four NFL teams.   

For the Jets and Chiefs, they came in the early Super Bowl years, which makes rating them easier.   But for the Oilers and Chargers, it was a challenge to try to rate them accurately, considering they played in the early AFL, which was generally considered a "weaker" league.  

I initially didn't want to even consider these older teams, but the general lack of stellar teams in the Chargers and Oilers/Titans history, I gave them a closer look.  Some of their stats are skewed because of the nature of the early AFL.  Up next, I'll preview the AFL 60s teams first, then the NFL's.

1961 Houston Oilers
Record: 10-3-1
Points Per Game: 36.6 (Ranked 1st among teams in sim)
Allowed Per Game: 17.3 (Ranked 20th in sim)
Point Differential: 19.3 (1st)
Turnover Differential: +9 (Tied for 19th)
Simple Rating System: 16.9 (3rd)
ELO Rating: 1564 (27th)
Yards Per Pass: 9.2 (1st)
Yards Per Carry: 4.2 (18th)
Yards Per Play: 6.5 (2nd)
Yards Per Pass Allowed: 5.6 (10th)
Yards Per Carry Allowed: 4.5 (26th)
Yards Per Play Allowed: 4.5 (13th)
Head Coach: Wally Lemm and Lou Rymkus.   Rymkus stated the year and was fired after a 1-3-1 start, Lemm took over and was unbeaten the rest of the way. 

Other Oilers/Titans teams considered: Despite the lengthy history, the Oilers/Titans haven't done much historically and ended up avoiding getting left out simply due to the Jaguars and Texans having done less.   The only Super Bowl appearance was from an unremarkable 1999 Titan squad.   The franchise did win the first two AFL titles in 1960 and 1961, with a far more statistically impressive 61 season.

The season: The Oilers had a very rough start in year two of the AFL.  They started 1-3-1, then canned coach Lou Rykmus.  Wally Lemm took over and righted the ship, as they went unbeaten the rest of the way.  They won the second ever AFL Championship 10-3 over San Diego.

Offense: Although the nature of the early AFL inflates the numbers significantly, the Oilers still had an impressive offense. They passed for 4568 yards and 48 touchdowns, cartoon-ish numbers for the era.    Gunslinger George Blanda wasn't the most careful with the ball, but they knew how to gain yards.  Receiver Charlie Hennigan had 1746 yards, teammate Bill Groman had 1175, and running back Billy Cannon led the AFL in rushing. 

Defense: The defense did finish second in the AFL in points allowed, netting five All-Stars and one All-Pro in cornerback Tony Banfield. 

Special Teams: Blanda also served as the kicker and was a pretty solid one at that.  Safety Jim Norton doubled as a serviceable punter and Cannon was a steady return man.

Overall Chances in the Sim: Obviously, their stats are very inflated by the uneven competition and offensive-friendly rules of the early AFL.  That said, the Oiler offense is still one with a lot of big-play ability and their defense is a decent enough unit.   They could be a sleeper in the sim. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1963 San Diego Chargers
Record: 11-3
Points Per Game: 28.5 (13th best among sim teams)
Allowed Per Game: 18.2 (Ranked 21st)
Point Differential: 10.3 (21st)
Turnover Differential: +9 (Tied for 19th)
Simple Rating System: +9.0 (Tied for 17th)
ELO Rating: 1565 (Ranked 26th)
Yards Per Pass: 8.8 (6th)
Yards Per Carry: 5.6 (1st)
Yards Per Play: 6.7 (1st)
Yards Per Pass Allowed: 6.3 (22nd)
Yards Per Carry Allowed: 3.9 (17th)
Yards Per Play Allowed: 4.7 (17th)
Head Coach: Sid Gillman, Hall of Fame coach who spent 18 years between the Chargers, Rams, and Oilers.  His lone championship came with the 63 Chargers.

Other Chargers teams considered: Like the Oilers, the choices for San Diego were pretty weak.  The only team to make a Super Bowl was a very forgettable 1994 squad.  Teams from the mid 2000s and early 1980s also were looked at, although each of them had early exits.  In the early AFL, they made the final five times in the first six years, only winning it all in 1963.

The season: They had a pretty balanced season, ultimately finishing with the AFL's best record by a game over division rival Oakland.   Their championship opponent, the Patriots, barely was above .500, and the Chargers destroyed them 51-10 in the final.

Offense: Although the AFL's nature inflates things, their run game was great, averaging 5.6 a run.  Paul Lowe had 1010 yards with Keith Lincoln adding 826.  Tobin Rote was the AFL's top rated passer that year with Hall of Famer Lance Alworth as his top target.  Another Hall of Famer anchored the line in right tackle Ron Mix.

Defense: First in the AFL in points allowed, their lone first-team All-Pro was defensive end Earl Faison.  Linebackers Emil Karas and Chuck Allen both made the AFL's Pro Bowl.

Special Teams: George Blair was an above average kicker for the time, with weak punting from Paul Maguire.  Alworth and Lincoln were steady return guys.

Overall Chances in the Sim: The offense has some nice playmakers, but their defense is relatively unremarkable by the sims standards.   On the surface, the Chargers are probably one of the weakest teams in the simulation.  But that by no means says that they're a pushover.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1968 New York Jets
Record: 11-3
Points Per Game: 29.9 (Ranked 8th among teams in sim)
Allowed Per Game: 20.0 (Ranked 24th)
Point Differential: 9.9 (22nd)
Turnover Differential: +15 (Tied for 12th)
Simple Rating System: 7.9 (25th)
ELO Rating: 1645 (22nd)
Yards Per Pass: 8.2 (12th)
Yards Per Carry: 3.4 (27th)
Yards Per Play: 5.5 (16th)
Yards Per Pass Allowed: 5.4 (5th)
Yards Per Carry Allowed: 3.2 (2nd)
Yards Per Play Allowed: 4.1 (4th)
Head Coach: Weeb Ewbank, as mentioned earlier, he's in the sim twice.  Won titles in 58-59 with the Colts, with the Jets from 63-73 with the one Super Bowl in 68.

Other Jets teams considered:  The Jets were pretty easy, as the 1968 team is the only champion in their history.   Their only other options only made it as far as the Conference finals.

The season: The Jets easily won the AFL East at 11-3, with the Raiders and Chiefs fighting in the West at 12-2 each.  The Jets avenged a regular season loss to the Raiders in the AFL final, then became their first AFL world champion in Super Bowl III.   They were a huge underdog to the Colts, but quarterback Joe Namath famously guaranteed a win and delivered, 16-7.

Offense: Namath was a gunslinger for sure and although he was far from the most efficient, he made big plays.  The Jets have one of the best one-two receiver combos in the sim in Don Maynard and George Sauer, both of which had 1000+ yard seasons.  They do have one of the weaker run games in the sim, however.  The O-line was anchored by 8-time all-star Winston Hill at left tackle.

Defense: They were 4th out of 10 AFL teams in points allowed, but were first in yards allowed and have solid per play averages in comparison to other sim teams.  The D-line was the strength, with three AFL All-Stars and one All-Pro in end Gerry Philbin. 

Special Teams: Jim Turner had a strong year kicking with solid punting from Curley Johnson.  Return game was respectable.

Overall Chances in the Sim: The passing game has big-play ability, but the weak running game could hurt them against the stronger defenses in the sim.  Plus, the Jets D is unremarkable compared to others in the sim.   They will probably be an underdog in most of their games, but that didn't stop them in real life from success. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, MrNFL said:

Other Jets teams considered:  The Jets were pretty easy, as the 1968 team is the only champion in their history.   Their only other options only made it as far as the Conference finals.

 

Maybe On My Opinion if MrNFL didn't chose the 1968 NY Jets, I Could have gone for the 1982 Team with the NY Sack Exchange (Mark Gastineau, Joe Klecko, Marty Lyons & Abdul Salaam)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1969 Kansas City Chiefs
Record: 11-3
Points Per Game: 25.6 (Ranked 23rd among teams in sim)
Allowed Per Game: 12.6 (Ranked 8th in sim)
Point Differential: 13.0 (11th)
Turnover Differential: +8 (24th)
Simple Rating System: +11.9 (11th)
ELO Rating: 1750 (10th)
Yards Per Pass: 7.5 (20th)
Yards Per Carry: 4.3 (14th)
Yards Per Play: 5.1 (23rd)
Yards Per Pass Allowed: 4.9 (1st)
Yards Per Carry Allowed: 3.5 (5th)
Yards Per Play Allowed: 4.0 (2nd)
Head Coach: Hank Stram, spent the 60s up to the mid 70s with the Chiefs and their predecessor the Dallas Texans.  One Super Bowl in 69 and two AFL titles. 

Other Chiefs teams considered: The Chiefs were fairly easy with the lone Super Bowl winner.   Only other teams with postseason success was the 66 team, which lost Super Bowl won, and the 62 Dallas Texans AFL title winner.  69 team beats both out fairly easily.

The season: In the final year of the AFL, the Chiefs finished second to the Raiders, who they lost to twice in the regular season.   After beating the Jets in the first round, the Chiefs met the Raiders again in the AFL final, this time winning 17-7.   Like the Jets from the previous year, the Chiefs were looked at as an underdog for Super Bowl IV, but they handled the Vikings 23-7.

Offense: Len Dawson is a Hall of Fame quarterback, although 1969 was actually a pretty weak year for him.  He missed half of the year as well to injury with Mike Livingston doing a respectable job in his place.  His weapons were decent enough, but not spectacular.   Their biggest strength was the line, featuring All-Pros Jim Tyrer and Ed Budde on the left side. 

Defense: Their D was stellar, with three first-team All-Pros and four eventual Hall of Famers.  Buck Buchanan and Curley Culp anchored things at defensive tackle.   Bobby Bell and Willie Lanier were top-tier linebackers, and Emmitt Thomas and Johnny Robinson patrolled the secondary.

Special Teams: The Chiefs have the Hall of Fame's lone pure kicker in Jan Stenerud, a solid punter in Jerrel Wilson, and a sturdy return group.

Overall Chances in the Sim: By the sim's standards, their offense is unremarkable.   But they boast one of the most impressive defenses with excellent players top to bottom.  They probably won't have any blowouts, but the defense alone gives the Chiefs a nice shot against any opponent. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 1960s (NFL)

1960 Philadelphia Eagles

Record: 10-2
Points Per Game: 26.8 (Tied for 19th best among sim teams)
Allowed Per Game: 20.5 (25th best in sim)
Point Differential: 6.3 (Last)
Turnover Differential: +15 (Tied for 12th)
Simple Rating System: +6.7 (26th)
ELO Rating: 1599 (25th)
Yards Per Pass: 8.9 (5th)
Yards Per Carry: 3.2 (Last)
Yards Per Play: 5.6 (12th)
Yards Per Pass Allowed: 7.0 (Last)
Yards Per Carry Allowed: 4.9 (Last)
Yards Per Play Allowed: 5.4 (27th)
Head Coach: Buck Shaw, only with the Eagles from 1958-1960, getting the title in his last year. He was with the 49ers from the mid 40s to mid 50s.

Other Eagles teams considered: The actual best Eagle team was the 1949 squad, but full rosters/starters/player numbers aren't available on Pro Football Reference for teams beyond 1950, so putting together an accurate team would be nearly impossible. From 1950 onward, the only Eagle champion came in 1960. The 2004 and 1980 teams that lost in the Super Bowl both got a serious look, but having the ring wins out.

The season: The 10-2 record was the best out of the 13 teams in the NFL that year, earning an East division title. They edged the Packers 17-13 in the NFL Championship.

Offense: Hall of Famer Norm Van Brocklin earned First-Team All-Pro in his final season and had Pro Bowl targets in receivers Pete Retzlaff and Tommy McDonald, and tight end Bobby Walton. Together, they had one of the strongest passing games of the era. Another Hall of Famer, Chuck Bednarik, anchored the line at center. However, their rushing attack was among the worst in the league and is at the bottom among the sim teams.

Defense: Their D was middle of the road in 1960, top players included All-Pro corner Tom Brookshier and Pro Bowlers Maxie Baughan at linebacker and Marion Campbell at end.

Special Teams: The previously mentioned Walston doubled as a solid kicker with Van Brocklin serving as a pretty good punter. Return man Ted Dean was okay.

Overall Chances in the Sim: They have one of the better passing attacks in the sim, but the weak running game could sink them against the stronger defenses. Additionally, the Eagles defense is unremarkable by the simulation's standards. On paper, they're probably toward the bottom-tier of the NFC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1962 Green Bay Packers
Record: 13-1
Points Per Game: 29.6 (Tied for 10th best among teams in sim)
Allowed Per Game: 10.6 (3rd best in sim)
Point Differential: 19.0 (2nd)
Turnover Differential: +22 (4th)
Simple Rating System: +19.7 (1st)
ELO Rating: 1756 (Tied for 6th)
Yards Per Pass: 8.4 (11th)
Yards Per Carry: 4.7 (8th)
Yards Per Play: 5.5 (19th)
Yards Per Pass Allowed: 5.9 (14th)
Yards Per Carry Allowed: 3.8 (12th)
Yards Per Play Allowed: 4.1 (4th)
Head Coach: Vince Lombardi, there's a reason the Super Bowl trophy is named after him.  He won five championships with the Packers over nine years.

Other Packers teams considered: Of the Lombardi-era teams, the 62 squad stands clearly above the rest.   But the 1996 team makes a very strong case.   They would easily hold their own among the best in the sim, but the 1962 team is just too good.

The season:  Their lone blemish was a 26-14 loss in Week 11 at Detroit (the Lions went 11-3 that year).  The Packers won the NFL championship 16-7 over the Giants.

Offense: Jim Taylor was far and away the best running back in 1962, with 1474 yards and 19 touchdowns in a 14 game season.  Bart Starr was the model for efficiency.  Their passing game didn't put up big numbers, but they completed passes at a high clip and avoided turnovers.  The offensive line has two Hall of Famers in center Jim Ringo and right tackle Forrest Gregg, and another in right guard Jerry Kramer who many say is one of the HOF's biggest snubs.   All three were first-team All-Pro in 1962.

Defense: An elite unit in every area, they had five first-team All-Pros (DE Willie Davis, DT Henry Jordan, LB Dan Currie, LB Bill Forester, and CB Herb Adderley).   And not included on that list were LB Ray Nitschke and S Willie Wood, both Hall of Famers. 

Special Teams: RG Jerry Kramer was a solid kicker with WR Boyd Dowler doing decent work as a punter.   Adderley and Wood both provided solid return skills

Overall Chances in the Sim: The Packers have possibly the best top-to-bottom defenses in the simulation, a top-tier run game and offensive line, and a strong special teams.   Their only flaw, if you can call it that, is a passing game without major play-makers.  But Starr is still a HOF QB for good reason.  Green Bay is definitely one of the top contenders in the simulation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1964 Cleveland Browns
Record: 10-3-1
Points Per Game: 29.6 (Tied for 10th among teams in simulation)
Allowed Per Game: 20.9 (27th in sim)
Point Differential: 8.7 (24th)
Turnover Differential: +14 (Tied for 14th)
Simple Rating System: +5.2 (Last)
ELO Rating: 1627 (23rd)
Yards Per Pass: 7.4 (21st)
Yards Per Carry: 5.0 (2nd)
Yards Per Play: 5.6 (11th)
Yards Per Pass Allowed: 6.8 (26th)
Yards Per Carry Allowed: 4.3 (25th)
Yards Per Play Allowed: 5.3 (26th)
Head Coach: Blanton Collier, was with the Browns from 1963-1970 with the lone title in 1964. 

Other Browns teams considered: The Browns won the NFL title in 64, 55, 54, and 50 with each getting a look.  If I were to do the series over from scratch, I'd maybe give the nod to one of the 50s teams instead of 64.  64 had the best offense of the group, the others had better defenses.  It's fairly close with all four. 

The season: The Browns narrowly edged the Cardinals in the East division despite losing and tying them in their two games.  The Cardinals went 9-3-2 to Cleveland's 10-3-1.   In the NFL Championship, despite being major underdogs to a 12-2 Colts team, the Browns dominated for a 27-0 win.

Offense: Jim Brown.  Arguably the best running back ever, he was about 400 yards better than the next closest back in 1964.  Their passing game wasn't bad though, Frank Ryan was a solid quarterback and even as a rookie, future Hall of Famer Paul Warfield was already a great receiver.   All-Pro Dick Schafrath led the line from tackle. 

Defense: Slightly above average in 1964, the defense had three Pro Bowl selections in linemen Dick Modzelewski and Bill Glass, plus linebacker Jim Houston.  Although they were 5th out of 14 teams in points allowed, the Browns gave up more yards than other team that year.

Special Teams: Even at age 40, Lou Groza could still kick.  Gary Collins was a good enough punter and Walter Roberts was a nice returner.

Overall Chances in the Sim: They have one of the weaker defenses in the simulation, which likely limits their ceiling.  However, even the strongest of defenses will struggle to contain Jim Brown and their passing game is good enough that you can't ignore it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1969 Minnesota Vikings
Record: 12-2
Points Per Game: 27.1 (Ranked 18th among teams in simulation)
Allowed Per Game: 9.5 (Ranked 1st in sim)
Point Differential: 17.6 (4th)
Turnover Differential: +12 (16th)
Simple Rating System: +17.6 (2nd)
ELO Rating: 1717 (14th)
Yards Per Pass: 7.2 (25th)
Yards Per Carry: 3.8 (25th)
Yards Per Play:  4.7 (Last)
Yards Per Pass Allowed: 4.9 (3rd)
Yards Per Carry Allowed: 3.2 (4th)
Yards Per Play Allowed: 3.4 (1st)
Head Coach: Bud Grant, Hall of Famer with the Vikings from 1967 to 1985 and made the Super Bowl four times, but never could win it all.

Other Vikings teams considered: One of only four non-champions in the sim, the Vikings were one of the toughest to pick.  Of the four Super Bowl appearances, the 1969 easily stands above the rest in almost every stat.   But it's the 1998 team, which went 15-1 and fell in the NFC Championship, which many would argue for.

What the 98 Vikings were to offense, the 69 squad was to defense, although that's maybe not as sexy.   The 69 squad had a better average point differential, a better SRS rating, and a deeper postseason run.   Plus, the 98 squad was 1st in points and 6th in allowed, with the 69 Vikings leading the league in both.  As impressive as the 98 team was, I think people forget how awesome the 69 team was.
 
The season: The Vikings lost their first game by one to the Giants, then were unbeaten and dominant apart from the finale against the Falcons, where they lost while resting players.  They easily won the final NFL Championship 27-7 over Cleveland and entered Super Bowl IV as a heavy favorite.   But like the year before, the AFL Champion won convincingly, 23-7 in favor of the Chiefs.

Offense: QB Joe Kapp's NFL career was pretty short and he's often forgotten, but he posted a fairly solid 1969 campaign.  His top target was first-team All-Pro WR Gene Washington.   The rest of his weapons were unremarkable, but their lone was excellent, featuring Hall of Fame center Mick Tingelhoff and multiple-time All-Pro Grady Alderman at LT.

Defense: 9.5 allowed per game.  9.5!!!  It all started with the "Purple People Eaters," possibly the greatest defensive line ever.    Hall of Famers Carl Eller and Alan Page were in their prime with near HOF'er Jim Marshall and Gary Larsen putting up strong seasons too.  Their linebackers and secondary weren't super memorable, save safety Paul Krause, the NFL's all-time interceptions king. 

Special Teams: Kicker Fred Cox was a first-team All-Pro selection in 1969, although their punter and returners were nothing special.

Overall Chances in the Sim: Even though they are one of the non-champions, this Viking team is no joke and could definitely hang with the best of the NFC.   The offense isn't special by the sim's standards, but with that defense, they'll be in every game. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 1970s. The 70s were an era with dynasties and AFC dominance, causing only three teams to make it into the simulation. However, those three teams are all major contenders in the AFC.

1972 Miami Dolphins
Record: 14-0
Points Per Game: 27.5 (Ranked 16th among teams in the simulation)
Allowed Per Game: 12.2 (Ranked 5th in the sim)
Point Differential: 15.3 (8th)
Turnover Differential: +18 (Tied for 8th)
Simple Rating System: +11.0 (14th)
ELO Rating: 1754 (8th)
Yards Per Pass: 8.6 (7th)
Yards Per Carry: 4.8 (3rd)
Yards Per Play: 5.6 (10th)
Yards Per Pass Allowed: 5.0 (4th)
Yards Per Carry Allowed: 4.0 (20th)
Yards Per Play Allowed: 4.3 (8th)
Head Coach: Don Shula, the NFL's winningest coach, he won two Super Bowls and made it to four more between the Colts (63-69) and Dolphins (70-95)

Other Dolphins teams considered: The 72 team makes it easy, although some might argue the 1973 champion was better. The 1984 team was great as well, but lost in the Super Bowl. Can't leave out the only modern team to complete the unbeaten season.

The season: The only team in the Super Bowl era to go unbeaten in the regular season and win the championship, they won Super Bowl VII over Washington 14-7.

Offense: Running, running, running, the Dolphins called run on 70% of their plays. But why wouldn't they? Larry Csonka provided the power and Mercury Morris the speed, both had 1000+ yards and averaged more than five a run. The line had two Hall of Famers in RG Larry Little and C Jim Langer. Passing wise, QB Bob Griese missed a good chunk of the year to injury, although Earl Morrall filled in admirably. They didn't pass often, but could get big yards when they did with the likes of Paul Warfield.

Defense: They were called the "No name defense" for lack of star power, but the group put up stellar numbers with an all-around strong unit. DE Bill Stanfill and FS Dick Anderson earned 1st-team All-Pro, Hall of Fame Nick Buoniconti was great at MLB, and SS Jake Scott earned Pro Bowl honors.

Special Teams: Garo Yepremian was a decent enough kicker. Their punting and return games were unremarkable.

Overall Chances in the Sim: There's a good reason this team went unbeaten. The defense is one of the best with no holes and their rushing attack is top-tier. Their passing game is weak by sim standards, but with that run game, they won't need to use it much. The Dolphins are certainly among the favorites in the AFC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1975 Pittsburgh Steelers
Record: 12-2
Points Per Game: 26.6 (Ranked 21st among teams in the sim)
Allowed Per Game: 11.6 (Ranked 4th)
Point Differential: 15.0 (Ranked 9th)
Turnover Differential: +5 (Tied for 26th)
Simple Rating System: +14.2 (6th)
ELO Rating: 1760 (4th)
Yards Per Pass: 7.5 (20th)
Yards Per Carry: 4.5 (10th)
Yards Per Play: 5.1 (22nd)
Yards Per Pass Allowed: 5.5 (8th)
Yards Per Carry Allowed: 4.2 (23rd)
Yards Per Play Allowed: 4.2 (5th)
Head Coach: Chuck Noll, Hall of Famer with the Steelers from 1969 to 1991, four-time Super Bowl winner.

Other Steelers teams considered: Having six Super Bowl winners to choose from makes things challenging.   The 2005 and 2008 winners were easy to knock out compared to the Steel Curtain era teams.  The 1975 team had the best points per game and allowed per game, best differential, best SRS rating and best ELO rating, putting them at the top. 

The Season: The second Steeler Super Bowl win, they went through the Colts and Raiders early in the playoffs, then edged the Cowboys 21-17 in Super Bowl X.

Offense: 1975 was QB Terry Bradshaw's highest-rated and most efficient season, although they didn't pass all that often.  He had 23-year-old receivers Lynn Swann and John Stallworth who were good, but not quite elite yet, as targets.   Their run game was at it's peak though, Franco Harris had a career high on the ground. 

Defense: The 75 defense had was the Steel Curtain at it's peak.  Three players were first-team All-Pro; DE L.C. Greenwood, LB Jack Ham, and CB Mel Blount (11 INTs!), and five more players earned Pro Bowls.  Ham and Blount, along with LB Jack Lambert and DT Joe Greene found their way to Canton.

Special Teams: Roy Gerela had a nice season kicking in 1975.   Punter Bobby Walden wasn't anything special, but they had a respectable return unit.

Overall Chances in the Sim: They boast one of the strongest defenses in the simulation, along with a great running game and a solid passing game.   The Steelers look to have one of the most "complete" teams in the simulation and will certainly factor in with the AFC's best.  

Edited by MrNFL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1976 Oakland Raiders
Record: 13-1
Points Per Game: 25.0 (Ranked 25th out of teams in simulation)
Allowed Per Game: 16.9 (19th in sim)
Point Differential: 8.1 (26th)
Turnover Differential: -4 (Last)
Simple Rating System: +8.5 (22nd)
ELO Rating: 1735 (13th)
Yards Per Pass: 8.9 (4th)
Yards Per Carry: 4.1 (21st)
Yards Per Play: 5.5 (17th)
Yards Per Pass Allowed: 6.4 (24th)
Yards Per Carry Allowed: 4.0 (21st)
Yards Per Play Allowed: 4.8 (19th)
Head Coach: John Madden, boom!  He was with the Raiders from 1969-1978 with his lone title in 1976.

Other Raiders teams considered: The three Raider champs all make a fairly good case.   The 76 squad has the best record, point differential, best points allowed per game, best SRS, and best ELO rating.

The Season: Their only regular season blemish was an ugly week 4 loss to the Patriots.   They avenged that loss in the divisional round, then dropped the Steelers in the AFC final and the Vikings in Super Bowl XI.

Offense: 76 was the best year for QB Ken Stabler with a 66.7% completion percentage, outstanding for the time.  Receiver Cliff Branch was a big-play option with Fred Biletnikoff and tight end Dave Casper strong possession guys.  Their run game was solid led by Mark van Eeghen and the line had Hall of Famers Art Shell and Gene Upshaw on the left side.

Defense: It wasn't a D with star power in 76, only linebacker Phil Villapiano made the Pro Bowl.  But they had some notable players still.  HOF CB Willie Brown was still a solid presence even at age 36, Jack Tatum was one of the hardest hitting safeties ever and Ted Hendricks was a HOF OLB. 

Special Teams: Errol Mann was a weak kicker and their return game wasn't the best, but they did have the NFL's lone Hall of Fame punter in Ray Guy.

Overall Chances in the Sim: Although not as statistically impressive as some other teams in the sim, their offense has some excellent playmakers and is well-rounded overall.  The D is above average and all together, the Raiders boast a solid squad. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 1980s
After a decade of AFC dominance in the 70s, the script flipped to NFC success in the 80s and into the mid 90s.  Four teams from the 80s are part of the simulation

1984 San Francisco 49ers
Record: 15-1
Points Per Game: 29.7 (Ranked 9th among teams in simulation)
Allowed Per Game: 14.2 (Ranked 10th)
Point Differential: 15.5 (7th)
Turnover Differential: +16 (11th)
Simple Rating System: +12.7 (10th)
ELO Rating: 1759 (5th)
Yards Per Pass: 8.2 (13th)
Yards Per Carry: 4.6 (9th)
Yards Per Play: 6.0 (6th)
Yards Per Pass Allowed: 6.9 (27th)
Yards Per Carry Allowed: 4.2 (24th)
Yards Per Play Allowed: 5.0 (25th)
Head Coach: Bill Walsh, Hall of Famer with three Super Bowl wins in San Fran from 1979 to 1988.

Other 49ers teams considered: This was one of the toughest to pick because the 84, 89, and 94 teams all could be argued as being a top 10 all-time team.  Between the three, the 84 team had the fewest points allowed, best point differential, best record, and best SRS rating.  

Plus, their postseason run was the most impressive in my opinion, taking out the Giants (who were two years away from a title), the Bears (who won it the next year) and the record-setting Dolphins.  Hard to leave out Jerry Rice, but the 84 team gets the nod.

The Season:  The only blemish came in a 20-17 week 7 loss to Pittsburgh, who went onto the AFC final.  They were the first team to ever go 15-1 and had a convincing playoff run.  Most impressively, they topped the Bears 23-0 in the NFC final and held a record-breaking Dolphin team to a 38-16 final in Super Bowl XIX, giving the 49ers their second ring.

Offense: Joe Montana was the model of efficiency at quarterback, putting together a lethal pass offense despite the lack of all-star receivers.  Dwight Clark and Freddie Solomon were solid, but not studs.   Wendell Tyler had a great year at running back (5.1 YPC, 1262 yds) and a young Roger Craig was emerging as a rushing and receiving threat.   The line had three Pro Bowlers and one All-Pro in RT Keith Fahnhorst.

Defense: They had five Pro Bowlers, including all four starters in the secondary (CB's Ronnie Lott and Eric Wright, S's Carlton Williamson and Dwight Hicks).   The front seven wasn't filled with big names, but the unit combined for the fewest points allowed that season, including no more than 17 in their final 11 games. 

Special Teams: Ray Wersching and Max Runager were respectable as the kicker and punter.   Dana McLemore was a strong punt returner, although the kickoff game wasn't anything special.

Overall Chances in the Sim: It's not a team that's necessarily outstanding at any one area, but it's a team that's very good pretty much across the board.  Their offense is incredibly efficient and their defense is solid from front-to-back.  The 49ers should definitely factor in among the NFC's best in the sim.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1985 Chicago Bears
Record: 15-1
Points Per Game: 28.5 (Ranked 14th among teams in simulation)
Allowed Per Game: 12.4 (Ranked 7th)
Point Differential: 16.1 (6th)
Turnover Differential: +23 (Tied for 2nd)
Simple Rating System: +15.9 (5th)
ELO Rating: 1767 (3rd)
Yards Per Pass: 7.6 (18th)
Yards Per Carry: 4.5 (11th)
Yards Per Play: 5.4 (21st)
Yards Per Pass Allowed: 5.4 (7th)
Yards Per Carry Allowed: 3.7 (11th)
Yards Per Play Allowed: 4.4 (10th)
Head Coach: Mike Ditka, with the Bears from 1982-92 with the lone Super Bowl win.

Other Bears teams considered: Considering the praise for the 85 Bears, this one was fairly easy.  The Bears actually had some dominant teams in the 40s, but those are out by default because of lack of info.   The 1963 champ was a solid squad too, but not the 85 team.

The Season:  Their lone loss came in week 13 to the Dolphins, 38-24.   Counting the playoffs, they held teams to single-digits nine times, including two playoff shutouts.   They flattened the Patriots 46-10 in the Super Bowl.

Offense: Even at age 31, Walter Payton was still among the best running backs in the game with fullback Matt Suhey providing a solid counter-punch.   Jim McMahon had his lone Pro Bowl at QB and put up a respectable campaign, his top outside target was speedster Willie Gault.  All-Pro left tackle Jimbo Covert anchored the line.

Defense: They had a stellar defensive line with Hall of Famers Dan Hampton and Richard Dent on the ends, along with All-Pro Steve McMichael and "Refrigerator" William Perry at tackle.  Mike Singletary was one of the best middle linebackers ever, and the secondary had nice talent as well with the likes of SS Dave Duerson and CB Leslie Frazier.

Special Teams: As a rookie, Kevin Butler was a solid kicker.  Their punting and punt returning was good enough with Gault acting as a strong kickoff returner.

Overall Chances in the Sim: They're often cited as one of the best ever and based on the defense alone, for good reason;  it's a dominant group from top-to-bottom.   Their passing game isn't anything special by the sim's standards, but Walter Payton will make up for that most of the time.   The Bears should factor among the NFC's best. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1986 New York Giants
Record: 14-2
Points Per Game: 23.2 (Ranked 26th among teams in simulation)
Allowed Per Game: 14.8 (12th)
Point Differential: 8.4 (25th)
Turnover Differential: +9 (Tied for 19th)
Simple Rating System: +9.0 (Tied for 17th)
ELO Rating: 1752 (9th)
Yards Per Pass: 7.4 (22nd)
Yards Per Carry: 4.0 (22nd)
Yards Per Play: 5.0 (24th)
Yards Per Pass Allowed: 5.9 (16th)
Yards Per Carry Allowed: 3.7 (10th)
Yards Per Play Allowed: 4.8 (20th)
Head Coach:Bill Parcells, spent 19 years between four teams, won both of his Super Bowls during Giants tenure from 1983-1990.

Other Giants teams considered: The old-timey champions in 1927 and 1938 are a no go because of limited stats. Both Coughlin-era Super Bowl champs were unremarkable teams that had a good postseason run. The 86 and 90 teams both had strong postseasons and regular seasons. They're better pretty close, but the 86 team has the slight edge on stats like SRS, ELO, and point differential.

The Season: They lost their opener at Dallas and then at midseason against Seattle, but finished strong from there. In the playoffs they destroyed the 49ers, shutout Washington, then beat Denver 39-20 in the Super Bowl.

Offense: He had a strong Super Bowl, but overall QB Phil Simms was a middle-tier player. Tight End Mark Bavaro was an All-Pro receiver and RB Joe Morris was among the best in the league in 1986. Pro Bowler Brad Benson led the line at left tackle.

Defense: Lawrence Taylor. He was so good he WON THE LEAGUE MVP AWARD as a defender, posting 20.5 sacks. Their D also had Hall of Fame ILB Harry Carson and Pro Bowl linemen Jim Burt and Leonard Marshall.

Special Teams: Raul Allegre was a decent enough kicker with okay returning from Phil McConkey. They did have arguably the league's best punter in Sean Landeta.

Overall Chances in the Sim: LT and the strong front-7 gives them a very formidable defense. Their run game is nice, but their passing game and offense overall is unremarkable by the sim's standards. Still, they have enough pieces to be in the NFC hunt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1988 Cincinnati Bengals
Record: 12-4
Points Per Game: 28.0 (Ranked 15th best among teams in sim)
Allowed Per Game: 20.6 (Ranked 26th)
Point Differential: 7.4 (27th)
Turnover Differential: +9 (Tied for 19th)
Simple Rating System: +6.1 (27th)
ELO Rating: 1608 (24th)
Yards Per Pass: 9.2 (1st)
Yards Per Carry: 4.8 (4th)
Yards Per Play: 6.1 (5th)
Yards Per Pass Allowed: 6.0 (17th)
Yards Per Carry Allowed: 4.2 (22nd)
Yards Per Play Allowed: 4.9 (21st)
Head Coach: Sam Wyche, with the Bengals from 1984-1991 with the lone Super Bowl appearance in 88.

Other Bengals teams considered: One of four non-championship squads in the sim, the Bengals were tough because their two Super Bowl teams, 1988 and 1981, are eerily close statistically.   Both went 12-4 with two points separating their differential, both lost close in the Super Bowl to the 49ers.   The 88 team has a slight edge in offense, differential, and SRS, getting the nod.     The next closest contender may have been the 2015 team, had they done anything in the playoffs.

The Season: They did earn the AFC's best record and had the most points per game in the league.   They defeated Seattle and Buffalo to advance to the Super Bowl, losing a tight one 20-16 to San Francisco.

Offense: Boomer Esiason had easily his best year, earning league MVP honors.   Receiving Eddie Brown averaged 24 a catch and the two-headed rushing attack of Ickey Woods and James Brooks both averaged 5+ a run.  Their line featured maybe the NFL's best ever left tackle in Anthony Munoz.

Defense: Average by 1988's standards, they did boast a first-team All-Pro nose tackle in Tim Krumrie and Pro Bowlers David Fulcher (SS) and Eric Thomas (CB) in the secondary.   Otherwise, they had a fairly forgettable group.

Special Teams: Jim Breech and Scott Fulhage were a bit below average for their kicking and punting with okay return games.

Overall Chances in the Sim: Their offense is very legitimate with strong playmakers in both the running and passing game.   That group should make Cincinnati more competitive than some may expect, but their lackluster D by sim standards

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 1990s

The early part of the 90s had continued NFC dominance with the AFC finally getting some titles in the final years of the millennium.   Five teams from the 90s are in the sim, three NFC and two AFC. 

1990 Buffalo Bills
Record: 13-3
Points Per Game: 26.8 (Tied for 19th best among teams in sim)
Allowed Per Game: 16.4 (Ranked 17th)
Point Differential: 10.4 (Tied for 19th)
Turnover Differential: +14 (Tied for 14th)
Simple Rating System: +8.6 (21st)
ELO Rating: 1684 (17th)
Yards Per Pass: 8.0 (14th)
Yards Per Carry: 4.3 (13th)
Yards Per Play: 5.7 (9th)
Yards Per Pass Allowed: 6.1 (19th)
Yards Per Carry Allowed: 3.7 (9th)
Yards Per Play Allowed: 4.7 (16th)
Head Coach: Marv Levy, with the Bills from 1986-97, getting them to all four of their Super Bowl appearances.

Other Bills teams considered: One of four non-championship squads in the sim, the Bills did have two AFL champions, but neither were overly spectacular.  Plus, I only went back to the AFL for the Chargers and Oilers/Titans because their other options were really weak.  Although all four of the AFC-winning 90s Bills teams have similar records, the first of the four teams is the best by advanced stats.

The Season:  The Bills posted the AFC's best record at 13-3.  After a tight first round playoff game against Miami (44-34), they crushed the Raiders 51-3 in the AFC Championships.   Their first of four straight Super Bowl appearances was their closest, only losing by one (20-19) to the Giants.

Offense: Playmakers galore, Jim Kelly was a top-tier QB, Thurman Thomas an excellent running back, and James Lofton and Andre Reed strong receiving targets.  All four are in the Hall of Fame.   All-Pro center Kent Hull and Pro Bowl LT Will Wolford led the line.

Defense: Bruce smith was a monster at defensive end, his 19 sacks netting him the Defensive Player of the Year.  Three of their four linebackers made the Pro Bowl in Cornelius Bennett, Shane Conlan, and Darryl Talley.  Their secondary was fairly forgettable though.

Special Teams: Much maligned for the late miss in the Super Bowl, Scott Norwood was an average kicker for 1990.  Rick Tuten was a weak punter and their return games were lackluster.

Overall Chances in the Sim: Their offense has a lot of big-play ability and the defense has Bruce Smith, who will cause a lot of problems for other teams.   The rest of the defense isn't outstanding, but Smith and the offensive studs they have should give the Bills a solid look against any opponent. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1991 Washington Redskins
Record: 14-2
Points Per Game: 30.3 (Ranked 7th among teams in sim)
Allowed Per Game: 14.0 (Ranked 9th)
Point Differential: 16.3 (5th)
Turnover Differential: +18 (Tied for 8th)
Simple Rating System: +16.6 (4th)
ELO Rating: 1756 (Tied for 6th)
Yards Per Pass: 8.4 (9th)
Yards Per Carry: 3.8 (24th)
Yards Per Play: 5.8 (8th)
Yards Per Pass Allowed: 5.4 (6th)
Yards Per Carry Allowed: 3.9 (18th)
Yards Per Play Allowed: 4.5 (15th)
Head Coach: Joe Gibbs, Hall of Fame coach who won 3 Super Bowls and made it to one other with Washington.

Other Redskins teams considered: Their other champions weren't overly impressive statistically compared to the 91 team, which had them beat in points per game, allowed, differential, SRS, and ELO.   The closest would have been the 1983 team had they not lost in the Super Bowl.

The Season: Their losses came by a combined five points in the final weeks against Dallas and Philadelphia.   They ran through Atlanta and Detroit to get to the Super Bowl, where they downed Buffalo 37-24. 

Offense: Mark Rypien was one of the top QBs that season with two stud receiving options in Gary Clark and Art Monk, both of which had 1000+ yard seasons.  Earnest Byner was a steady and reliable running back with a good change of pace in Ricky Ervins.  All-Pro left tackle Jim Lachey anchored the line. 

Defense: It wasn't a star-studded group.  CB Darrell Green was an All-Pro and maybe the best in the league, but he and DE Charles Mann were the only Pro Bowlers on the roster.  That didn't stop them from allowing the second fewest points and third fewest yards that year.

Special Teams: Chip Lohmiller made the most field goals in the league, although his accuracy was middling.  Their punting and kick return games stunk, but Brian Mitchell was a great punt returner.

Overall Chances in the Sim: They aren't a team that's outstanding in any one area, but they're very good pretty much everywhere.  A very complete team that maybe gets forgotten in the "greatest ever" conversation due to the lack of star-power and a dynastic run.  They should be right in the thick of it in the NFC. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1992 Dallas Cowboys
Record: 13-3
Points Per Game: 25.6 (Ranked 24th among teams in sim)
Allowed Per Game: 15.2 (Ranked 14th)
Point Differential: 10.4 (Tied for 19th)
Turnover Differential: +7 (25th)
Simple Rating System: +9.9 (16th)
ELO Rating: 1749 (11th)
Yards Per Pass: 7.3 (23rd)
Yards Per Carry: 4.2 (19th)
Yards Per Play: 5.5  (18th)
Yards Per Pass Allowed: 5.5 (9th)
Yards Per Carry Allowed: 3.6 (8th)
Yards Per Play Allowed: 4.5 (14th)
Head Coach: Jimmy Johnson, with the Cowboys from 1989 to 1993, winning the first two of their three 90s Super Bowls.

Other Cowboys teams considered: Dallas was one of the toughest to choose because their five Super Bowl winners are all fairly even statistically.   Of the 90s teams, 92 has the best point differential, SRS, and record by a small margin.  1971 is right there though too, they have the same SRS as 92 and a better point differential, although their strength of schedule is listed as being a good amount weaker.   It's truly a toss-up, but the 92 team gets the edge.

The Season:  The first of the three Super Bowls in the 90s, the 92 team is actually one of the few not to earn the top seed in their season, their 13-3 record was a game behind San Francisco.  After smacking the Eagles in the first round, Dallas beat the 49ers in the NFC final 30-20, then destroyed Buffalo 52-17 in the Super Bowl.

Offense: The "Triplets" really came into form this year.  Troy Aikman was a very efficient QB, Emmitt Smith was the top running back in 92, and Michael Irvin was among the best receivers.  Add in All-Pro tight end Jay Novacek and two Pro Bowl lineman in LG Nate Newton and C Mark Stepnoski, and you have a pretty strong offense.

Defense: Not a group of stars in 92, the team had zero Pro Bowlers despite solid numbers overall.  They did have guys with Pro Bowl years later on, including Hall of Fame end Charles Haley, LB Ken Norton, and DT Russell Maryland.

Special Teams: Rookie K Lin Elliott was decent enough with solid punting from Mike Saxon.  Kelvin Martin handled returns and took two punts to the house in 92.

Overall Chances in the Sim: They aren't statistically eye-popping like some others in the sim, but the offense has big-play ability and the defense is nice from top-to-bottom.  Emmitt Smith will factor in among the top backs in the sim.   The Cowboys should be right in the NFC hunt. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×